Communication from Long Ago

Whew! It has been a BUSY first week back and we have worked hard!! Our focus in Social Studies was communication from Long Ago. We learned that teachers communicated to students a little bit differently long ago — there were no Promethean Boards, or even books like we know today to read. Kids in the 1750’s used a book called a Hornbook to learn to read. We completed a shared reading of a passage describing a Hornbook and each student highlighted what they felt was important information. On the back of our reading passage was a diagram of a Hornbook with labels that described each part.

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Then, we tried our hand at making a Hornbook. Although the materials we all papers, we pretended that we had a wood panel, that expensive paper from long ago, and even a thin piece of cow horn to cover the paper.

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Another aspect of communication that we talked about was writing, specifically what people write on and what was used to write. We explored different types of papers — papyrus, parchment … and did an activity where students had to follow directions to draw a scroll — a type of paper that was used for communication in ancient civilizations. Then, each child was given a quill, or feather, to practice writing with. I must say, I was quite impressed with how neatly everyone was able to write with their quill — maybe we will start using quills and ink instead of pencils? 🙂

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Are you loving the Arabic that Hasan added? I loved learning how Arabic is written from right to left, unlike our writing!

Are you loving the Arabic that Hasan added? I loved learning how Arabic is written from right to left, unlike our writing!

Next week: Thomas Jefferson, a final project for Long Ago and Today, and a new unit on Measurement … can’t wait 🙂

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